Did I ruin my zero turn?

bertsmobile1

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I use anti-seize on my blade bolts. A bit always gets on the bolt face next to the blade, and instead of over-tightening the bolt, it seems to slip a bit under it. I use a Ryobi 1/2 impact wrench rather than my air tools and never have a problem. There are two types of anti-seize available nowadays: aluminum or copper-based. I prefer the latter because of its ability to withstand heat when I use it on exhaust studs and bolts. Go sparingly... a little dab'll do ya!
Are you sure of that ?
Copper is generally used for all but very high temperatures and on stainless steel.
The silver is usually nickel for stainless and very high temperatures like exhaust manifold bolts .
 

Rivets

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I agree with Bert on this one. I use copper based on everything but stainless.
 

slomo

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Regular silver based is rated at 1600F.

Copper version goes to 1800F.

Nickel goes to 2400F.

All well above what a blade bolt will ever see.

slomo
 
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For what it's worth, this is the reason why belts are still used as it's a safety feature. If you were mowing and say hit a larger rock that lodged between the blade and deck, locking the deck up solid, the belt can slip while the motor stalls out due to the lock up being beyond it's brake horse power rating to still spin. If the belt was really stretched and dried out or loose, the crank pulley might still spin but deck would be locked if still powered. If it was a chain or shaft drive, things would break easier. So be glad you have a belt.

Any time you do have a lock up, especially with newer equipment that might not be as heavy-duty as something from 30-50 years ago, be sure to inspect EVERYTHING. Maybe they used a thinner gauge sheet metal on the deck itself and it buckled slightly and not readily perceivable, but the blade is now canted and pulley for blade isn't lined up right, and now you have belts getting torn up, or maybe a crack gets introduced to the deck, maybe the blade's hub got cracked loose from the deck, and it drops a bolt while mowing over time, etc..
 

dlgg7

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Yep, anti-seize on threads, and I remove my blades monthly to clean underdeck and re-sharpen and balance, so bolts haven't been on too long anyway.
 

bkeller500

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Never had a problem removing blades before, but I am taking the advice given here and will start using the anti-seize on my blade/spindle bolts. Thanks for sharing the wisdom.
 

dlgg7

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Yep, 18yrs on mower and 4th set of blades. I do use a 24" breaker bar to break'em loose and tighten.
 

slomo

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If you use anti sneeze on ANY bolt, the torque value will be "around" 30% less than a dry bolt.

Rough example - dry bolt proper torque is 50ft lbs. With anti sneeze 35ft lbs. Also depends on the lube type and clean threads ect...
 

hlw49

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I use anti-seize on my blade bolts. A bit always gets on the bolt face next to the blade, and instead of over-tightening the bolt, it seems to slip a bit under it. I use a Ryobi 1/2 impact wrench rather than my air tools and never have a problem. There are two types of anti-seize available nowadays: aluminum or copper-based. I prefer the latter because of its ability to withstand heat when I use it on exhaust studs and bolts. Go sparingly... a little dab'll do ya!
Exmark actually recommends the copper anti-seize on their blade bolts. I use anti-seize mostly to keep the bolts and bolt holes from gaulding.
 
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