Best for hills?

1BUCKEYE

Member
Joined
May 25, 2022
Threads
1
Messages
17
MAYBE, SOMEDAY, SOMEONE WILL DEVISE A WAY OF PUTTING A WEED WHACKER ON A ZT OR TRACTOR. PUSH A BUTTON... THE WEED WHACKER COMES OUT FROM UNDERNEATH & THEN... YA FLIP A SWITCH TO TURN IT ON & OFF. PUSH THE BUTTON TO RETRACT IT.(KINDA LIKE "KILLIN' 2 BIRDS WITH ONE STONE", YA KNOW? LOL )
 

texhobbit

Forum Newbie
Joined
Apr 17, 2012
Threads
1
Messages
8
I have been lurking on this forum for some time but this is one topic that I feel very qualified to address. I just measured it and the slope that I mow is 25 degrees. I won't spend the money for a Ventrac so I've tried several other mower models in the past. Every lawn tractor that I tried would mow fine uphill but would "ski" downhill because of the upfront engine. I tried a regular zero turn once and could not keep the front end pointed in the direction I wanted to go. I used a rear engine Snapper for years but always felt like it was dangerous because I could never clutch it going uphill. If I did, there was no safe way to get started again without doing a wheelie. I only turned it over once when I was forced to stop on an uphill because of an obstacle. That was a scary incident! After I finally got it to start again, it blew blue smoke for an hour. I promptly decided to trade it in on a different mower. After much research (some on this forum) I opted for a 42" CubCadet RZT-S. This was back in 2012 and I'm still using it. As Gearhead mentioned it is a zero turn with a steering wheel. It is by far the safest mower for slopes that I can afford. I CAN mow the 25 degree slope from side to side without feeling tippy, but mostly mow up and down. The rear mounted engine (22hp) keeps me from sliding downhill although I did replace the stock tires with chevron ag tires. And with the independent hydrostatic drive units I can even stop and start on an uphill without the front wheels trying to come off the ground. So until I can afford a Ventrac, I'm sticking with the Cub RZT-S.
 

JD X485SE

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2012
Threads
1
Messages
10
I chose a John Deere X322. Four wheel drive, four wheel brakes, handles on the fenders for crossing slopes.
You mention an X322 (which I've never heard of and neither has TractorData) and you picture an X738.

What?!?
 

Skippydiesel

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2020
Threads
5
Messages
117
One person's hill is another person's cliff.

Without seeing "THE HILL" , its slope, obstacles, even soil type, the best advice is either overkill or dangerously insufficient.
 

GearHead36

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2023
Threads
13
Messages
191
I bet goats are more maintenance than just about any machine. They still need to be fed in the Winter.

However... I have several areas of brush that's littered with Poison Ivy, and I'd love to be able to rent some goats.
 

GrumpyCat

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 6, 2023
Threads
0
Messages
161
Some words on "tractors" ;
Ride on lawn mowers are for the most part NOT tractors, even if they look a little like a miniature version.
Tractors come in all shapes & sizes, are heavy duty (compared with ride on mowers), usually diesel, have 3 point linkage & tow bars.
Meh. If it tows, even a kid’s wagon, it is by definition a tractor.

You do know the thing with an engine at the front of a semi truck is a tractor?
 

GrumpyCat

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 6, 2023
Threads
0
Messages
161
I mow about 10 acres that contains some significant slopes. Started with a lawn tractor (it was a craftsman), never had an issue, but the high CG definitely caused a pucker factor that limited the slopes I was comfortable to attack. Next was a 60” badboy ZTR with lugged tires, much better, the lower CG definitely felt better, was able to greatly expand the area I mowed, however damp soil conditions could result in a loss of traction and thus control. Mowing downhill was definitely more controllable on the steeper areas when the soil was damp. Current mower is a 60” eXmark radius with lugged tires, don’t have dimensions, but the tires are larger than the badboy. The eXmark is by far the “stickiest“ mower I have tried so far when it comes to slopes. I dont know if it’s the larger tires or weight distribution, but it just feels more solid on slopes, and I have had others tell me the same. It also has a roll bar, which I use when pushing the envelop on slope.
If it has ROPS then it is probably over 1000 pounds, which would contribute to “sticky”.
 
Top