Electricity just got confusing

Rivets

Lawn Royalty
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Mar 11, 2012
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Messages
14,940
Star, I did repair the terminal. I always remove that spring terminal and use a crimp style with one modification. Take a piece on Ni-Chome wire, bend into a U at least 3/4” on both sides and push into the wire. Then crimp an auto style terminal over the top. Works great especially when you don’t have much wire to work with. Also, I was hoping you didn’t realize that one bottle was missing. Good stuff.
 

RevB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2022
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100
it because it got one these stupid plug wire terminals.
View attachment 68893
They tend to break the high tension (plug wire) lead internal conductor then make contact sometimes and other times they don't.

Usually you can snip off the section where the hole is and reinstall the terminal.

Get these instead...

NGK (8328) LB01EP Spark Plug Cap , Black


They screw into the plug wire about an inch.
it because it got one these stupid plug wire terminals.
View attachment 68893
They tend to break the high tension (plug wire) lead internal conductor then make contact sometimes and other times they don't.

Usually you can snip off the section where the hole is and reinstall the terminal.
 

Peva

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2011
Threads
5
Messages
33
FYI - You should avoid firing an ignition (whether lawnmower or automotive) without a path to ground either through the specified spark plug gap or direct short to ground.

Here's why: The ignition coil can generate much higher voltage than it takes to fire the properly gapped spark plug. When the spark plug fires, the resistance of the ionized air in the spark plug gap is so low that the coil output voltage can't rise above the voltage that it took to ionize the air in the gap to initiate the spark. When the coil output wire is held out in the air, far from a ground, the voltage rises tens of thousands of volts higher than the spark plug gap allows. The insulation inside the coil cannot withstand that high of a voltage and will arc through the insulation of the coil - which blows a pin hole through the insulation, leaving carbonized (conductive) material coating the inside of that hole - so the coil is now defective - no longer allows the coil output voltage to rise to the ionization voltage of the proper spark plug gap.
 

VegetiveSteam

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Joined
Jun 1, 2022
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Messages
429
FYI - You should avoid firing an ignition (whether lawnmower or automotive) without a path to ground either through the specified spark plug gap or direct short to ground.

Here's why: The ignition coil can generate much higher voltage than it takes to fire the properly gapped spark plug. When the spark plug fires, the resistance of the ionized air in the spark plug gap is so low that the coil output voltage can't rise above the voltage that it took to ionize the air in the gap to initiate the spark. When the coil output wire is held out in the air, far from a ground, the voltage rises tens of thousands of volts higher than the spark plug gap allows. The insulation inside the coil cannot withstand that high of a voltage and will arc through the insulation of the coil - which blows a pin hole through the insulation, leaving carbonized (conductive) material coating the inside of that hole - so the coil is now defective - no longer allows the coil output voltage to rise to the ionization voltage of the proper spark plug gap.
Folks will argue that they do it all the time and never had one fail but what they don't realize is, while it may not immediately fail, they have almost certainly just shortened the life of that coil significantly. So now a coil that really should have lasted the life of the engine fails prematurely.
 
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