Probably asked a million times already -- weed control and grasses

Monte1076

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Ok, I live in "North Texas" (Grass Zone 9). My lawn should be Bermuda (that's what they planted originally, with sod), but is currently overrun with weeds to the point where my back yard was so overrun I had to end up buying a new, more powerful mower (I bought an EGO Select Cut 7.5Ah mower).

I'm really, really, really tired of these weeds. They're weeds of all varieties in my yard. I just want them gone. I thought about just putting Roundup on the whole yard and just starting over, but I'm wondering about a few things:

1. What would happen if I just cut it as short as I can, then try to put down some new grass seed and fertilizer? Will a grass choke out weeds, and if so, which one can I use for my region (Region 9)?
2. What fertilizer/seeds should I use? What brand/mix? Granular or liquid? I've tried both in the past with little to no success.
3. I even tried an off-brand of Tenacity, and it acted like it worked (the weed leaves turned white like they were supposed to), but I don't know if it actually killed any weeds..
4. I'm not married to Bermuda, but I want something that will survive the Texas summers with little watering (mainly just natural rainfall) -- if that's possible.
5. How much of this can I actually do in the fall. I know there's supposed to be a "fall feeding", but I'm reluctant to do that if it's going to make the weeds worse.
6. I don't have a scarifier or aerator or dethatcher.

I'm not looking for a "Hank Hill" lawn, per se. Just something that's weed-free and looks nice. If it grows in thick, that's fine too. I've got some equipment now that I think can handle it.

Because of the problem with the weeds, I usually mow once a week, but if that turned into every 10 days to two weeks, I wouldn't be averse to that.

Help, please! I know I probably can't get rid of all these weeds in one season, but if I can see a reduction, that will be a start.
 

Monte1076

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You could overseed with a different variety. Take a look at these recommendations from Texas A&M.
I thought about Zoysia, but I heard it's really slow growing, and it's harder to grow from seeds. Another option (but barely, because I live on the "edge" of the green on the chart) is Buffalograss, I suppose I could try to just reseed with Bermuda, but there are a lot of different types.

I still need to get rid of the weeds, though. Not sure what to do there. Do I go heavy nitrogen? Just use roundup on the whole yard and just start over, overseed in the fall, then lay down fall fertilizer and a spring pre-emergent, or what?
 

MParr

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I thought about Zoysia, but I heard it's really slow growing, and it's harder to grow from seeds. Another option (but barely, because I live on the "edge" of the green on the chart) is Buffalograss, I suppose I could try to just reseed with Bermuda, but there are a lot of different types.

I still need to get rid of the weeds, though. Not sure what to do there. Do I go heavy nitrogen? Just use roundup on the whole yard and just start over, overseed in the fall, then lay down fall fertilizer and a spring pre-emergent, or what?
Trimec herbicide works well on weed in Bermudagrass. Be careful with it around trees and flower beds.
 
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StarTech

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Trimec herbicide works well on weed in Bermudagrass. Be careful with it around trees and flower beds.
That is because has 2-4-D broad-leaf herbicide as the main ingredient. It is not to be sprayed when daily air temperature above 80F as it will vaporize and drift on desired broad-leaf plants killing them. Also if you live next to a cotton field, the farmer can sue you for crop damages. I had to try it even it was his own worker double spraying growth regulator in the section that didn''t produce any cotton. He had to have cotton plants tested.

At least it is the salt version and is not nearly as volatile as the Ester version. The Ester version can cause drift damage even below 80F.
 

MParr

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That is because has 2-4-D broad-leaf herbicide as the main ingredient. It is not to be sprayed when daily air temperature above 80F as it will vaporize and drift on desired broad-leaf plants killing them. Also if you live next to a cotton field, the farmer can sue you for crop damages. I had to try it even it was his own worker double spraying growth regulator in the section that didn''t produce any cotton. He had to have cotton plants tested.

At least it is the salt version and is not nearly as volatile as the Ester version. The Ester version can cause drift damage even below 80F.
Yep. And, the Dicamba is active in soil. I still have my commercial pesticide license. I was accused of killing a farmer’s cotton. The idiot killed his own cotton. He had sprayed his field perimeter with Roundup and didn’t thoroughly clean out his sprayer. Good thing, I kept a spray record of every application.
It’s very important to follow the product label.
Above 80F, Target 6+ would be my choice.
 

jimksr

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Look for how to with doc. They may have your answers for Bermuda. I’m trying to recover a lawn in Oklahoma too
 

Stokdgs

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My experiences with Bermuda grasses in Texas and California, is that it will die back to looking dead in winter and will come back with a vengeance in summer or when the soil heats up... It needs fertilizer and water to do it's best...
I personally don't like it because it is very invasive, has these harder than heck roots that go way, way, down, and are pretty much impossible to pull out... And then you have the seeds that fall off and are ready to go next season..Bermuda grows underground horizontally and pops up easily everywhere... It can get really dark green if fed a good fertilizer a couple times a year and watered in, and of course, watered regularly..
It has been my experiences that weeds Will grow where nothing will. And they will try to grow in the driest, most neglected soil... Because that is their job.. Some weeds actually produce nice looking flowers.. But I know, the look is so - irregular - :)
I think if you cut down all the weeds to bare ground, rake as much out as possible, aerate if possible, put down your fertilizer, compost, whatever you decide to use, and the bermuda seeds, it will come back and it being so aggressive, it will take over the place and choke out the weeds.. It can also grow really thick and high. It is pretty much indestructible when its taken care of..
One more thing that can help with weeds - After - you get your lawn up and going great - a pre-emergent herbicide, applied in early Spring before any weed seeds germinate.. It will leave a layer on the soil that will kill most seed growth as soon as they pop up and keep them from fully growing for so many months..
You just have to remember this - a pre-emergent herbicide will kill - All - seeds, bad ones and good ones.. There is no "smart" pre-emergent herbicide out there... All or nothing.. :)
But you have to water the lawn.. Or anything else you plant and want to see again, unless you have regular rain from above...
My family in Southern Texas ( San Antonio), all have a grass called St. Augustine.. It grows by runners on top of the soil.. It can be finicky for them down there in 90% humidity day and night weather, etc..But it is what everyone uses, except some that go with Bermuda grasses..
What kind of soil do you have there??? Hardpan, Lake Bottom Clay,,Caliche?, Sandy? Sandy Loam? All these things have to be looked at to be able to give you the best advice..
I was stationed in Northern Texas for a spell once.. Sweetwater AFS, Sweetwater Texas.. Abilene was close by and they had a huge SAC (Strategic Air Command) airbase there.. Those were the days... :)
Good luck with this..
 
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