Hustlers Raptor XDX help

Engine207

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Hi all!
First post here, so go easy on me, boys! Went out to start my 2021 Hustler Raptor XDX, and all I got was a click. Checked the battery at 12.9V (which had been on a trickle), verified the 15A fuse was good, made sure my deck clutch was pushed down, and my drive arms were fully out. When I look at my hour meter, there’s a little icon that flashes in the run position, but solid in the off position.

I just cut the grass last week without any problems and parked it in the garage. I believe my mower thinks the interlock parking brake isn’t fully engaged. I’d appreciate some help troubleshooting, adjusting or bypassing the interlock. TIA!
 

Rivets

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Here is my procedure for diagnosing electrical problems on tractors. With a little tweaking it works on Z-turns. I’m thinking you may have a bad battery, which these tests will confirm or deny.

Electrical problems can be very easy or very difficult, depending on four things.

1. How well you understand basic electricity.
2. What tools you have and know how to use.
3. How well you follow directions.
4. You don't overlook or assume anything and verify everything.

Remember we cannot see what you are doing. You are our eyes, ears and fingers in solving this problem. You must be as accurate as you can when you report back. The two basic tools we will ask you to use are a test light and a multi-meter. If you have an assistant when going through these tests it would be very helpful. These steps work the best when done in order, so please don't jump around. Now let's solve this problem.
First, check the fuse(s), check battery connections for corrosion (clean if necessary) and voltage - above 12.5 volts should be good. Check and make sure the chassis ground is clean and tight.
Second, check for power from the battery to one of the large terminals on the solenoid. One of the wires is connected directly to the battery and has power all the time so one of the large terminals should light a test light or show 12 volts on a meter at all times.
Third, check for power at the small terminal of the solenoid while depressing the clutch/brake pedal and holding the key in the start position (you may need an assistant to sit in the seat to override the safety switch). If your solenoid is a four wire solenoid, check both small wire terminals as one is ground and the other is power from the ignition switch. If your solenoid is a three wire solenoid, make sure the solenoid body is not corroded where it bolts to the chassis of the mower as this is your ground path back to the battery. If in doubt, remove the solenoid and clean the mounting area down to bare metal. If there is no power to the small terminal then your problem is most likely a safety switch, ignition switch or in the wiring.
Fourth, check for power on the other large terminal of the solenoid while holding the key in the start position (you may need an assistant to sit in the seat to override the safety switch).
Fifth, check for power at the starter while holding the key in the start position (assistant again).
Sixth, check your ground circuit back to the battery.
After you have gone through each of the above steps, let us know what happened when you did each step. At that point we will have great info to tell you how to proceed. Remember you are our eyes, ears, and fingers, so please be as accurate as possible.

Be as specific as possible with voltage readings as this will help diagnose your problem quicker. If you do not know how to perform the above checks, just ask and I will try to guide you through it. Youtube also has some videos and as you know a picture is worth a thousand words
 

Engine207

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Here is my procedure for diagnosing electrical problems on tractors. With a little tweaking it works on Z-turns. I’m thinking you may have a bad battery, which these tests will confirm or deny.
Electrical problems can be very easy or very difficult, depending on four things.
1. How well you understand basic electricity.
2. What tools you have and know how to use.
3. How well you follow directions.
4. You don't overlook or assume anything and verify everything.
Remember we cannot see what you are doing. You are our eyes, ears and fingers in solving this problem. You must be as accurate as you can when you report back. The two basic tools we will ask you to use are a test light and a multi-meter. If you have an assistant when going through these tests it would be very helpful. These steps work the best when done in order, so please don't jump around. Now let's solve this problem.
First, check the fuse(s), check battery connections for corrosion (clean if necessary) and voltage - above 12.5 volts should be good. Check and make sure the chassis ground is clean and tight.
Second, check for power from the battery to one of the large terminals on the solenoid. One of the wires is connected directly to the battery and has power all the time so one of the large terminals should light a test light or show 12 volts on a meter at all times.
Third, check for power at the small terminal of the solenoid while depressing the clutch/brake pedal and holding the key in the start position (you may need an assistant to sit in the seat to override the safety switch). If your solenoid is a four wire solenoid, check both small wire terminals as one is ground and the other is power from the ignition switch. If your solenoid is a three wire solenoid, make sure the solenoid body is not corroded where it bolts to the chassis of the mower as this is your ground path back to the battery. If in doubt, remove the solenoid and clean the mounting area down to bare metal. If there is no power to the small terminal then your problem is most likely a safety switch, ignition switch or in the wiring.
Fourth, check for power on the other large terminal of the solenoid while holding the key in the start position (you may need an assistant to sit in the seat to override the safety switch).
Fifth, check for power at the starter while holding the key in the start position (assistant again).
Sixth, check your ground circuit back to the battery.
After you have gone through each of the above steps, let us know what happened when you did each step. At that point we will have great info to tell you how to proceed. Remember you are our eyes, ears, and fingers, so please be as accurate as possible.
Be as specific as possible with voltage readings as this will help diagnose your problem quicker. If you do not know how to perform the above checks, just ask and I will try to guide you through it. Youtube also has some videos and as you know a picture is worth a thousand words
I’ll give you some additional history to consider.
The dealer where I bought it told me that the AGM batteries have very short lives without being kept on a trickle. After messing with my last battery for weeks, he just replaced it with the one in there.
I’d also previous problem with starting that was solved with another battery.
 

Engine207

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  • I checked the 15A fuse and it’s intact
  • I checked the battery connectionsand there was no corrosion. Voltage at the terminals shows 12.64 volts
  • I checked the chassis ground it’s clean and tight
  • I checked the power from the battery to one of the large terminals on the solenoid. It was 12.54V
  • I checked power at the small terminal of the solenoid while depressing the clutch/brake pedal and holding the key in the start position. It jumped around a little, but seemed to be around 129 mV
  • I checked for power on the other large terminal of the solenoid while holding the key in the start position. It was about 12.3V
  • I checked for power at the starter while holding the key in the start position (assistant again). It was 129 mV
  • I checked the ground circuit back to the battery. It showed continuity from the battery to the chassis
Since there is essentially no power (129 mV) to the small terminal, I’m feeling more convinced that the problem is most likely the interlock safety switch or the ignition switch. What do you think?
 

Rivets

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I agree, but do one more check. Touch a jumper lead from solenoid to battery terminal to small solenoid start terminal. Starter kicks in, your assumption is correct.
 

Engine207

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I agree, but do one more check. Touch a jumper lead from solenoid to battery terminal to small solenoid start terminal. Starter kicks in, your assumption is correct.
Gotcha. This is to eliminate the solenoid and the starter itself as the problem, yes?
 

Engine207

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Touch a jumper lead from solenoid to battery terminal to small solenoid start terminal.
Surprisingly, I’ve not done this before. Can I get a quick walk-through? What wire gauge does the jumper lead need to be? Is there a particular connection order? Do u remove the jumper wire after it starts? Any particular do’s/dont’s, etc?
 

Rivets

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Any good jumper wire will work. You will see a few sparks, you just touch the small terminal. If the starter engages and spins the engine remove the jumper and the starter should stop.
 

Engine207

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So, if the starter has turned the engine over, and I remove the jumper, that won’t cut the engine, will it?

I’m hoping to get it started, cut the grass, then deal with the permanent repairs (new sensors? ignition switch?).
 
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